Inguinal Hernia

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INJURY TITLE

Inguinal Hernia

 

INJURY OVERVIEW

This is a protrusion of the contents of the abdomen (stomach) through the inguinal canal. It usually appears as a swelling in the groin area. Eighty percent of all hernias are inguinal, men are 25 times more likely to suffer an inguinal hernia and 5% of the population will suffer an inguinal hernia.

 

INJURY IN-DEPTH INFORMATION

Inguinal hernias can either be direct or indirect. Direct hernias happen when part of the abdomen herniates through a weak point in the muscular abdominal wall. Indirect hernias occur when part of the abdomen bulges through a part of you called ‘the deep inguinal ring’ (this is less common and occurs due to a birth defect).

 

COMMON SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

  • Pain in the groin on exertion
  • Pain in the groin when coughing or sneezing
  • Visible bulge in the groin – this can disappear when lying down

 

HOW IS IT ASSESSED

  • Physical examination of the abdominal area including observation (looking), palpation (feeling), testing of abdominal strength (i.e. sit-up) and coughing.
  • Ultrasound scan.

 

GENERAL TREATMENT

If it not adequately assessed and treated and inguinal hernia can get larger and more painful, the condition can become very serious for future health.

  • Possible surgical intervention
  • Post surgical rehabilitation including gradual core strength development and gradual return to activity and exercise.

 

 

WHICH HEALTH PROFESSIONAL TO CONSULT

PHYSIO

MEDIC     X

PODIATRY     

Put an ‘X’ next to each health professional that most commonly deals with this injury.

i.e. tennis elbow would be Physio and Medic as injections are common, whereas for muscular LBP it would be Physio and not Medic as they would just refer them to a Physio.

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