Scaphoid fracture

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INJURY TITLE

Scaphoid fracture

 

INJURY OVERVIEW

Very common fracture of the hand.  Usually caused by a fall onto an outstretched hand.  The difficulty here is that the pain can settle very quickly and so you may not think of getting it looked at for a while, at which point the facture is called a ‘latent fracture’.

 

INJURY IN-DEPTH INFORMATION

The scaphoind is a small bone in your wrist.  It is on the thumb side of your wrist and can be felt quite easily (show this).

 

An injury to this can be very painful and complicated.  The problem is that if the bone isn’t afforded the chance to heal, it can become very difficult to manage.  Surgery can be required to prevent the bone from dying.  This is very much an absolute worst case scenario, but it is vital that if you think you may have done this injury, you get it seen to quickly.

 

COMMON SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

  • Fall onto outstretched hand
  • Pain over the end of your wrist (on your thumb side), in what’s called the anatomical snuff box (show this).
  • Pain on gripping
  • Pain on weight bearing through the hand
  • Difficulty with intricate tasks like fastening buttons.

 

HOW IS IT ASSESSED

  • Pain on palpation of the anatomical snuffbox
  • Pain on pushing thumb into your wrist (show this)
  • X-Ray to look for factures (these are not always picked up by the X-Ray)
  • MRI or Bone scan will reveal the fracture if it is suspected.

 

 

GENERAL TREATMENT

  • Usually immobilised in plaster for 6-8 weeks
  • When out of plaster, strengthening of the hand should commence
  • Gripping exercises
  • Steadily increasing the use of the hand
  • Manual therapy to counteract any stiffness after being in the plaster

 

Exercise Videos: i.e.

  • Rotator cuff strengthening
  • Pec stretch
  • etc

 

WHICH HEALTH PROFESSIONAL TO CONSULT

PHYSIO     X

MEDIC     X

PODIATRY     

Put an ‘X’ next to each health professional that most commonly deals with this injury.

i.e. tennis elbow would be Physio and Medic as injections are common, whereas for muscular LBP it would be Physio and not Medic as they would just refer them to a Physio.

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